The Journal of heredity2012; 103(3); 380-390; doi: 10.1093/jhered/ess003

Maternal lineages in native Canadian equine populations and their relationship to the Nordic and Mountain and Moorland pony breeds.

Abstract: A 378-bp section of the mitochondrial displacement loop was used to estimate genetic diversity in the native Canadian equine populations. The inclusion of 10 Mountain and Moorland, 3 Nordic pony breeds, 2 feral populations, and 5 horse breeds were also investigated as they may have influenced the development (or rejuvenation) of the native Canadian populations. A total of 281 samples were sequenced, which produced 75 haplotypes derived from 54 informative sites. On further investigation, 36 of these 75 haplotypes were found to be previously unreported. Overall, total diversity was lowest in the feral Sable Island population with a haplotype diversity (0.27 ± 0.12), nucleotide diversity (0.0007 ± 0.0004), and pairwise difference of 0.286 ± 0.317. This is not surprising due to the geographic isolation of this population. Haplotype diversity was highest (1.00 ± 0.13) in the New Forest population, pairwise difference was highest (8.061 ± 4.028) in the Icelandic breed, whereas nucleotide diversity was highest in the Exmoor breed (0.0209 ± 0.0025). Within the Canadian populations, haplotype diversity was highest in the Newfoundland pony (0.96 ± 0.08), whereas pairwise difference and nucleotide diversity was highest in the Canadian horse (7.090 ± 3.581 and 0.0188 ± 0.0042, respectively). Three different estimates of genetic distances were used to examine the phylogenetic relationships amongst these populations. All 3 estimates produced similar topologies. In general, the native Canadian populations were highly represented in the D clade, with particular emphasis in the D1 and D2 clades. This is an important factor when considering the phylogenetic conservation of these Canadian equine populations.
Publication Date: 2012-04-13 PubMed ID: 22504109DOI: 10.1093/jhered/ess003Google Scholar: Lookup
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  • Journal Article
  • Research Support
  • Non-U.S. Gov't

Summary

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This research focuses on the genetic diversity of native Canadian horse populations and their relationship to other breeds like Nordic, Mountain and Moorland ponies. It involves the use of a 378-bp mitochondrial displacement loop to sequence samples and discover unique haplotypes. The study found that these Canadian equine populations have a significant representation in the D clade of the phylogenetic tree, which has implications for their conservation.

Research Methodology and Sample Analysis

  • The researchers conducted a genetic analysis through sequencing a 378-bp section of the mitochondrial displacement loop. This technique allowed them to estimate the genetic diversity within native Canadian equine populations.
  • The study included different horse breeds such as 10 Mountain and Moorland, 3 Nordic pony breeds, 2 feral populations, and 5 other horse breeds. These were included due to their suspected influence in shaping the genetic makeup of the native Canadian populations.
  • A total of 281 samples were analyzed which revealed 75 different haplotypes from 54 informative sites. Interestingly, 36 of these haplotypes hadn’t been previously reported.

Diversity in Different Populations

  • The lowest diversity was found in the feral Sable Island population, which can be attributed to its geographical isolation. This was measured in terms of haplotype diversity (0.27 ± 0.12), nucleotide diversity (0.0007 ± 0.0004), and pairwise difference (0.286 ± 0.317).
  • The New Forest population exhibited the highest haplotype diversity (1.00 ± 0.13); the Icelandic breed showed the highest pairwise difference (8.061 ± 4.028); and the Exmoor breed had the highest nucleotide diversity (0.0209 ± 0.0025).
  • Within Canadian populations, the Newfoundland pony recorded the highest haplotype diversity (0.96 ± 0.08), while the Canadian horse had the highest pairwise difference and nucleotide diversity (7.090 ± 3.581 and 0.0188 ± 0.0042, respectively).

Phylogenetic Relationships

  • The researchers used three different estimates of genetic distances to study the phylogenetic relationships among the different populations.
  • All three methods produced similar topologies, indicating a consistent overview of the genetic relationships.
  • Notably, the native Canadian populations were predominantly represented in the D clade, particularly in the D1 and D2 clades, highlighting their specific phylogenetic characteristic.
  • This representation in the D clade is significant when considering the conservation of these native Canadian equine populations.

Cite This Article

APA
Prystupa JM, Hind P, Cothran EG, Plante Y. (2012). Maternal lineages in native Canadian equine populations and their relationship to the Nordic and Mountain and Moorland pony breeds. J Hered, 103(3), 380-390. https://doi.org/10.1093/jhered/ess003

Publication

ISSN: 1465-7333
NlmUniqueID: 0375373
Country: United States
Language: English
Volume: 103
Issue: 3
Pages: 380-390

Researcher Affiliations

Prystupa, Jaclyn Mercedes
  • Department of Animal and Poultry Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A8. jmp479@mail.usask.ca
Hind, Pamela
    Cothran, E Gus
      Plante, Yves

        MeSH Terms

        • Animals
        • Bayes Theorem
        • Canada
        • DNA, Mitochondrial / genetics
        • Equidae / genetics
        • Female
        • Genetic Variation
        • Haplotypes
        • Likelihood Functions
        • Models, Genetic
        • Phylogeny
        • Sequence Analysis, DNA

        Citations

        This article has been cited 14 times.
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