American journal of veterinary research2016; 77(3); 300-309; doi: 10.2460/ajvr.77.3.300

Effects of diet-induced weight gain and turnout to pasture on insulin sensitivity in moderately insulin resistant horses.

Abstract: To quantify insulin sensitivity and monitor glucose, insulin, and lipid concentrations in a group of moderately insulin-resistant horses during induction of obesity by use of a forage diet supplemented with fat and during subsequent turnout to pasture. ANIMALS 9 adult Standardbred mares (11 to 20 years old). Methods: Weight gain of horses was induced during 22 weeks by use of a forage diet supplemented with fat fed in gradually increasing amounts, followed by feeding of that fat-supplemented diet at 2.5 times the daily maintenance requirements. Horses were then turned out to pasture. Insulin sensitivity was measured with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method before and after weight gain and after 4 weeks at pasture. Body weight, body condition score, and cresty neck score as well as fasting and postprandial concentrations of plasma insulin, plasma glucose, serum triglyceride, and serum nonesterified fatty acids were measured during the study. Results: Body weight typically increased by 10%, and body condition score (scale, 1 to 9) increased by > 1.5 from the start to the end of the weight-gain period. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity or metabolic clearance rate of insulin during the weight-gain period. Four weeks at pasture generally improved insulin sensitivity and metabolic clearance rate of insulin by 54% and 32%, respectively, but there was no change in body weight or body condition score. Conclusions: Findings indicated that dietary composition played a more important role than did short-term weight gain on alterations in insulin sensitivity of horses.
Publication Date: 2016-02-27 PubMed ID: 26919602DOI: 10.2460/ajvr.77.3.300Google Scholar: Lookup
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  • Journal Article
  • Research Support
  • Non-U.S. Gov't

Summary

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This research investigates the impact of weight gain through a fattening diet, and subsequent pasture turnout, on insulin sensitivity in moderately insulin resistant horses.

Methods

  • The research was undertaken on 9 adult Standardbred mares which were between 11 to 20 years old.
  • The mares underwent a period of weight gain for 22 weeks where they were fed a forage diet supplemented with increasing amounts of fat, eventually being fed at 2.5 times their daily maintenance requirements.
  • Following this, the horses were then turned out to pasture.
  • Insulin sensitivity was measured using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method before and after the weight gain phase, and after four weeks on the pasture. Other measurements taken during the study included body weight, body condition score, cresty neck score, as well as plasma insulin, plasma glucose, serum triglyceride, and serum nonesterified fatty acid concentrations.

Results

  • The body weight of mares typically increased by 10% during the weight gain period, and the body condition score also increased significantly.
  • In contrast, there were no significant changes in insulin sensitivity or the metabolic clearance rate of insulin during the weight gain phase.
  • After four weeks of being out to pasture, there were significant improvements in both insulin sensitivity and metabolic clearance rate of insulin (by 54% and 32% respectively), but no changes in body weight or condition.

Conclusion

  • The findings suggest that dietary composition played a more crucial role in changes to insulin sensitivity in the horses, compared to short-term weight gain.
  • This provides important insights into managing insulin resistance in horses and other similar animals.

Cite This Article

APA
Lindu00e5se SS, Nostell KE, Mu00fcller CE, Jensen-Waern M, Bru00f6jer JT. (2016). Effects of diet-induced weight gain and turnout to pasture on insulin sensitivity in moderately insulin resistant horses. Am J Vet Res, 77(3), 300-309. https://doi.org/10.2460/ajvr.77.3.300

Publication

ISSN: 1943-5681
NlmUniqueID: 0375011
Country: United States
Language: English
Volume: 77
Issue: 3
Pages: 300-309

Researcher Affiliations

Lindu00e5se, Sanna S
    Nostell, Katarina E
      Mu00fcller, Cecilia E
        Jensen-Waern, Marianne
          Bru00f6jer, Johan T

            MeSH Terms

            • Animal Feed / analysis
            • Animal Husbandry
            • Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
            • Animals
            • Blood Glucose / analysis
            • Diet / veterinary
            • Female
            • Glucose Clamp Technique / veterinary
            • Horse Diseases / blood
            • Horse Diseases / diet therapy
            • Horses / physiology
            • Insulin / blood
            • Insulin Resistance
            • Weight Gain

            Citations

            This article has been cited 7 times.
            1. Stang FL, Bjerregaard R, Mu00fcller CE, Ergon u00c5, Halling M, Thorringer NW, Kidane A, Jensen RB. The effect of harvest time of forage on carbohydrate digestion in horses quantified by in vitro and mobile bag techniques.. J Anim Sci 2023 Jan 3;101.
              doi: 10.1093/jas/skac422pubmed: 36576899google scholar: lookup
            2. Lindu00e5se S, Nostell K, Bergsten P, Forslund A, Bru00f6jer J. Evaluation of fasting plasma insulin and proxy measurements to assess insulin sensitivity in horses.. BMC Vet Res 2021 Feb 15;17(1):78.
              doi: 10.1186/s12917-021-02781-5pubmed: 33588833google scholar: lookup
            3. Delarocque J, Frers F, Huber K, Feige K, Warnken T. Weight loss is linearly associated with a reduction of the insulin response to an oral glucose test in Icelandic horses.. BMC Vet Res 2020 May 24;16(1):151.
              doi: 10.1186/s12917-020-02356-wpubmed: 32448298google scholar: lookup
            4. d' Fonseca NMM, Gibson CME, van Doorn DA, de Ruijter-Villani M, Stout TAE, Roelfsema E. Effect of long-term overfeeding of a high-energy diet on glucose tolerance in Shetland pony mares.. J Vet Intern Med 2020 May;34(3):1339-1349.
              doi: 10.1111/jvim.15788pubmed: 32374454google scholar: lookup
            5. Lindu00e5se S, Nostell K, Su00f6der J, Bru00f6jer J. Relationship Between u03b2-cell Response and Insulin Sensitivity in Horses based on the Oral Sugar Test and the Euglycemic Hyperinsulinemic Clamp.. J Vet Intern Med 2017 Sep;31(5):1541-1550.
              doi: 10.1111/jvim.14799pubmed: 28796307google scholar: lookup
            6. Nostell KE, Lindu00e5se SS, Bru00f6jer JT. Blood pressure in Warmblood horses before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp.. Acta Vet Scand 2016 Oct 20;58(Suppl 1):65.
              doi: 10.1186/s13028-016-0247-ypubmed: 27766986google scholar: lookup
            7. Lindu00e5se S, Nostell K, Bru00f6jer J. A modified oral sugar test for evaluation of insulin and glucose dynamics in horses.. Acta Vet Scand 2016 Oct 20;58(Suppl 1):64.
              doi: 10.1186/s13028-016-0246-zpubmed: 27766982google scholar: lookup