Journal of equine veterinary science2018; 72; 89-96; doi: 10.1016/j.jevs.2018.10.023

Foal-Level Risk Factors Associated With Development of Rhodococcus equi Pneumonia at a Quarter Horse Breeding Farm.

Abstract: The occurrence of Rhodococcus equi at farms varies, with disease occurring endemically at some farms, but only sporadically, or not at all at other farms. Only some foals residing on endemic farms develop clinical signs of disease. Limited evidence is available regarding foal-level risk factors for the development of R. equi pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to identify foal-level risk factors associated with the development of R. equi pneumonia among foals at a large breeding farm in Texas with a recurrent problem of R. equi pneumonia. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from foals born at the farm from January 2009 through December 2011 that met the criteria for inclusion. Dam-level, foal-level, and health-related data were collected from all foals. Independent variables were analyzed with logistic regression, controlling for the effect of year. Data from 787 foals born at the farm were included, of which 209 (27%) developed R. equi pneumonia. The cumulative incidence of disease at the farm varied significantly by year. Foals that were diagnosed with a prior morbidity besides R. equi were less likely to develop R. equi pneumonia.
Publication Date: 2018-11-03 PubMed ID: 30929790DOI: 10.1016/j.jevs.2018.10.023Google Scholar: Lookup
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  • Journal Article
  • Research Support
  • Non-U.S. Gov't

Summary

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The research article focuses on assessing the risk factors at the foal level that are correlated with the development of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia at a Quarter Horse breeding farm in Texas, experiencing regular occurrences of the disease.

Overview of the Research

  • The issue of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in horse breeding farms appears to vary; some farms experience it as an endemic problem while others either deal with it sporadically or do not encounter it at all.
  • Out of the foals existing in farms where the disease is endemic, only a certain fraction exhibit clinical signs of the pneumonia.
  • This study aims to fill a gap in existing research, where scarce evidence is available concerning the foal-level risk factors that contribute to the development of R. equi pneumonia.

Methodology of the Study

  • A retrospective cohort study was conducted using data collected from foals born on the farm between January 2009 and December 2011 and meeting the inclusion criteria.
  • Data regarding the dams (mother horses), foals, and their health were gathered from all the foals born during this period.
  • Independent variables were subjected to logistic regression while controlling for the effect of the year to determine the risk factors to the development of R. equi pneumonia.

Findings of the Study

  • A total of 787 foals born on the farm were taken into account for the study. Out of these, 209 (approximately 27%) developed R. equi pneumonia.
  • The study found that the cumulative incidence of the disease on the farm varied significantly from year to year.
  • A startling revelation was that the foals diagnosed with a prior morbidity, or diseases other than R. equi, were less likely to subsequently develop R. equi pneumonia.

Cite This Article

APA
Coleman MC, Blodgett GP, Bevevino KE, Ivanek R, Cummings KJ, Carter GK, Cohen ND. (2018). Foal-Level Risk Factors Associated With Development of Rhodococcus equi Pneumonia at a Quarter Horse Breeding Farm. J Equine Vet Sci, 72, 89-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2018.10.023

Publication

ISSN: 0737-0806
NlmUniqueID: 8216840
Country: United States
Language: English
Volume: 72
Pages: 89-96
PII: S0737-0806(18)30595-1

Researcher Affiliations

Coleman, Michelle C
  • Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX. Electronic address: mcoleman@cvm.tamu.edu.
Blodgett, Glenn P
  • 6666 Ranch, Guthrie, TX.
Bevevino, Kari E
  • Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
Ivanek, Renata
  • Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
Cummings, Kevin J
  • Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
Carter, Gerald Kent
  • Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.
Cohen, Noah D
  • Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.

MeSH Terms

  • Actinomycetales Infections / veterinary
  • Animals
  • Animals, Newborn
  • Breeding
  • Farms
  • Horse Diseases
  • Horses
  • Retrospective Studies
  • Rhodococcus equi
  • Risk Factors
  • Texas

Citations

This article has been cited 2 times.
  1. Kahn SK, Cywes-Bentley C, Blodgett GP, Canaday NM, Turner-Garcia CE, Flores-Ahlschwede P, Metcalfe LL, Nevill M, Vinacur M, Sutter PJ, Meyer SC, Bordin AI, Pier GB, Cohen ND. Randomized, controlled trial comparing Rhodococcus equi and poly-N-acetyl glucosamine hyperimmune plasma to prevent Ru2009equi pneumonia in foals.. J Vet Intern Med 2021 Nov;35(6):2912-2919.
    doi: 10.1111/jvim.16294pubmed: 34738651google scholar: lookup
  2. u00c1lvarez-Narvu00e1ez S, Berghaus LJ, Morris ERA, Willingham-Lane JM, Slovis NM, Giguere S, Cohen ND. A Common Practice of Widespread Antimicrobial Use in Horse Production Promotes Multi-Drug Resistance.. Sci Rep 2020 Jan 22;10(1):911.
    doi: 10.1038/s41598-020-57479-9pubmed: 31969575google scholar: lookup