Veterinary parasitology2021; 296; 109511; doi: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2021.109511

Ivermectin treatment in lactating mares results in suboptimal ivermectin exposure in their suckling foals.

Abstract: The management of equine strongyles has become problematic over the last decade because of an increased prevalence of drug-resistant isolates worldwide. Therapeutic options are therefore limited, leaving macrocyclic lactones as the most often effective drug class. However, their lipophilic properties result in a long-lasting elimination that could favour drug resistance selection. As a result, ivermectin treatment in lactating mares could promote suboptimal exposure of their foal parasites to ivermectin, thereby selecting for more resistant worms. To test for this putative transfer, we selected two groups of six foal-mare pairs, one group of mares receiving ivermectin and the other being left untreated. We compared faecal egg count trajectories in foals from the two groups and quantified plasma ivermectin concentrations in ivermectin treated mares and their foals during seven days. Our results showed limited but sustained plasmatic exposure of foals associated with non-significant faecal egg count reduction (P = 0.69). This suggests that ivermectin treatment in lactating mares results in suboptimal exposure to the drug in their foal.
Publication Date: 2021-07-03 PubMed ID: 34237517DOI: 10.1016/j.vetpar.2021.109511Google Scholar: Lookup
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  • Journal Article

Summary

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The research article examines the problem of drug-resistant equine diseases and the effects of ivermectin treatment in lactating mares on their foals, revealing that such treatment leads to suboptimal ivermectin exposure in the young horses.

Research Context

  • The researchers aimed to investigate the growing challenge of managing equine strongyles (a type of parasite), which has become problematic over the last decade due to increased prevalence of drug-resistant strains globally. This limits available therapeutic options, making macrocyclic lactones the most frequently effective class of drugs.
  • Given the lipophilic properties of macrocyclic lactones, these drugs have a long elimination period, which could promote selection of drug-resistant parasites.
  • Therefore, the researchers hypothesized that ivermectin treatment in lactating mares could inadvertently promote suboptimal exposure of their foal parasites to ivermectin, leading to the selection of more drug-resistant worms.

Methodology

  • The team chose two groups of six mare-foal pairs, one group of mares receiving ivermectin and the other group left untreated for comparison.
  • They then compared the trajectories of faecal egg counts in foals from the two groups, which is a way of measuring parasite infection levels.
  • Plasma ivermectin concentrations in both the ivermectin-treated mares and their suckling foals were quantified over a period of seven days.

Key Findings

  • The research found that there was limited but sustained plasmatic exposure of foals to the ivermectin, together with a non-significant reduction in faecal egg counts (P = 0.69), suggesting that the level of drug exposure for the foals was not optimal.
  • Thus, the study shows that treating lactating mares with ivermectin results in suboptimal exposure to the drug in their lactating foals.

Cite This Article

APA
Mayinda GD, Serreau D, Gesbert A, Reigner F, Sutra JF, Lespine A, Sallu00e9 G. (2021). Ivermectin treatment in lactating mares results in suboptimal ivermectin exposure in their suckling foals. Vet Parasitol, 296, 109511. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2021.109511

Publication

ISSN: 1873-2550
NlmUniqueID: 7602745
Country: Netherlands
Language: English
Volume: 296
Pages: 109511
PII: S0304-4017(21)00170-9

Researcher Affiliations

Mayinda, Ghismon-de-Kasin
  • NRAE, Universitu00e9 de Tours, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santu00e9 Publique, F-37380, Nouzilly, France.
Serreau, Delphine
  • NRAE, Universitu00e9 de Tours, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santu00e9 Publique, F-37380, Nouzilly, France.
Gesbert, Amandine
  • INRAE, UE1297 Physiologie Animale de l'Orfrasiu00e8re, F-37380, Nouzilly, France.
Reigner, Fabrice
  • INRAE, UE1297 Physiologie Animale de l'Orfrasiu00e8re, F-37380, Nouzilly, France.
Sutra, Jean-Franu00e7ois
  • INRAE, Ecole Nationale Vu00e9tu00e9rinaire de Toulouse, UMR1436 INTHERES, F-31076, Toulouse, France.
Lespine, Anne
  • INRAE, Ecole Nationale Vu00e9tu00e9rinaire de Toulouse, UMR1436 INTHERES, F-31076, Toulouse, France.
Sallu00e9, Guillaume
  • NRAE, Universitu00e9 de Tours, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santu00e9 Publique, F-37380, Nouzilly, France. Electronic address: Guillaume.Salle@inrae.fr.

MeSH Terms

  • Animals
  • Drug Resistance
  • Female
  • Horse Diseases / drug therapy
  • Horses / blood
  • Ivermectin / blood
  • Ivermectin / therapeutic use
  • Lactation
  • Parasite Egg Count / veterinary

Citations

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