Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases2020; 75; 101608; doi: 10.1016/j.cimid.2020.101608

Cutaneous habronemosis in horses: First molecular characterization of Habronema muscae in Israel.

Abstract: Draschia megastoma, Habronema microstoma, and Habronema muscae are the etiological agents of cutaneous habronemosis, commonly known as summer sores, an inflammatory cutaneous and ocular parasitic disease of horses and other equids transmitted by flies. Here, we describe a cluster of cutaneous habronemosis in five horses that showed single or multiple typical cutaneous ulcerative wounds located on the face, lower forelegs or hindquarters in Israel with the presence of typical "sulphur granules." All affected animals were confirmed by histopathological and/or molecular methods to be infected by H. muscae. This constitutes the first report of cutaneous habronemosis in Israel in which the causative nematode, H. muscae, was identified by molecular means. Cutaneous habronemosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in equids with cutaneous ulcerative lesions during the summer months, especially when affected animals are refractive to antibiotic treatment alone.
Publication Date: 2020-12-28 PubMed ID: 33383475DOI: 10.1016/j.cimid.2020.101608Google Scholar: Lookup
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  • Journal Article

Summary

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The research uncovers the presence, for the first time in Israel, of Habronema muscae, a nematode parasite causing cutaneous habronemosis, a parasitic disease in horses leading to skin and eye inflammation, commonly identified by ulcerative wounds and notorious “sulphur granules.”

Background

  • Cutaneous habronemosis, also known as summer sores, is a severe skin and eye affliction caused by three main parasitic nematodes, namely Draschia megastoma, Habronema microstoma, and Habronema muscae.
  • This parasitic disease is principally spread by flies and is typically prevalent in horses and other kinds of equids.

Findings

  • The research focused on a specific instance where five horses in Israel presented with characteristic signs of cutaneous habronemosis, particularly ulcerative wounds in strategic places such as the face, forelegs, or hindquarters, with an obvious presence of “sulphur granules.”
  • These horses were subjected to confirmatory histopathological and molecular tests, which revealed an infection by H. muscae, thus marking the first-ever formal account of cutaneous habronemosis in Israel.
  • This also represents the first case in the country where the causative organism was identified via molecular methods.

Implications and Recommendations

  • The authors recommend for cutaneous habronemosis to be viewed as a potential diagnosis for horses showing signs of skin ulcers during summer months.
  • This is especially applicable if the affected animals don’t show signs of recovery when administered with antibiotics solely, as it signifies a parasitic source of the affliction rather than a bacterial one.

Cite This Article

APA
Salant H, Rojas A, Yardeny D, Brenner O, Schvartz G, Baneth G, Dvir E. (2020). Cutaneous habronemosis in horses: First molecular characterization of Habronema muscae in Israel. Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis, 75, 101608. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2020.101608

Publication

ISSN: 1878-1667
NlmUniqueID: 7808924
Country: England
Language: English
Volume: 75
Pages: 101608
PII: S0147-9571(20)30197-1

Researcher Affiliations

Salant, H
  • Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel. Electronic address: Harold.Salant@mail.huji.ac.il.
Rojas, A
  • Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel; Departamento de Parasitologu00eda, Facultad de Microbiologu00eda, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Josu00e9, Costa Rica; Centro de Investigaciu00f3n en Enfermedades Tropicales, Facultad de Microbiologu00eda, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Josu00e9, Costa Rica.
Yardeny, D
  • Department of Animal Sciences, Tel Hai College, Upper Galilee, Israel.
Brenner, O
  • Department of Veterinary Resources, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.
Schvartz, G
  • Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.
Baneth, G
  • Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.
Dvir, E
  • Department of Animal Sciences, Tel Hai College, Upper Galilee, Israel.

MeSH Terms

  • Animals
  • Diptera
  • Horse Diseases / diagnosis
  • Horse Diseases / epidemiology
  • Horses
  • Israel / epidemiology
  • Spirurida Infections / diagnosis
  • Spirurida Infections / epidemiology
  • Spirurida Infections / veterinary
  • Spiruroidea

Citations

This article has been cited 1 times.
  1. Maldonado-Cabrera B, Su00e1nchez-Machado DI, Lu00f3pez-Cervantes J, Osuna-Chu00e1vez RF, Ibarra-Zazueta C, Robles-Zepeda RE. Efficacy of chitosan in the treatment of chronic skin lesions in a horse: A case report.. Vet Anim Sci 2022 Sep;17:100261.
    doi: 10.1016/j.vas.2022.100261pubmed: 35856003google scholar: lookup