The Veterinary clinics of North America. Equine practice2021; 37(3); 549-561; doi: 10.1016/j.cveq.2021.08.004

Pharmacology of the Equine Foot: Medical Pain Management for Laminitis.

Abstract: One of the biggest challenges in managing laminitis in horses remains the control of pain. The best analgesic approach is a multimodal approach, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and/or constant rate infusions of α-2 agonists, ketamine, and lidocaine. Recent literature indicates that amitriptyline and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor might be beneficial. Clinically oriented studies will be needed if they have a place in laminitis pain management. The systemic pain control can be combined with local techniques such as long-acting local anesthetics or epidural catheterization that allows for administration of potent analgesic therapy with a lower risk of negative side effects.
Publication Date: 2021-10-19 PubMed ID: 34674911DOI: 10.1016/j.cveq.2021.08.004Google Scholar: Lookup
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Summary

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This research article focuses on the best methods of managing pain in horses suffering from laminitis using a blend of different drugs and therapies.

Objective of the Research

The main purpose of this research is to find the most effective method of managing pain in horses with laminitis, a severe hoof condition. Many approaches have been studied, ranging from the application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to the usage of opioids, α-2 agonists, ketamine, and lidocaine.

Methodology

  • The researchers considered both multi-modal and conventional analgesic therapies, assessing their effectiveness in pain management for horses with laminitis. Medications under examination included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and constant rate infusions of α-2 agonists, ketamine, and lidocaine.
  • Additionally, they evaluated the potential advantages of amitriptyline and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor – two substances indicated in recent literature as potentially beneficial in these cases. However, these require more clinically oriented studies to confirm their place in laminitis pain management.

Key Findings

  • The researchers concluded that the most efficient means of tackling laminitis pain in horses was through a multimodal approach, combining various medications and therapies. This combination therapy allows for a potent analgesic effect with fewer risks of adverse side effects.
  • Local techniques such as long-acting local anesthetics or epidural catheterization also seem promising when combined with systemic pain control, as they can deliver potent analgesic therapy with lower risks of unwanted side effects.
  • It’s important to note, however, that while amitriptyline and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor showed promise in preliminary stages, more clinically oriented studies are still needed to truly determine their efficacy in laminitis pain management.

Implications

The findings of this research could significantly impact how veterinarians approach pain management in laminitis-affected horses. They suggest a shift towards a multimodal approach, combining various drugs and therapies to manage pain most efficiently. Continued research into the potential benefits of amitriptyline and soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors could also lead to the development of new treatments in future.

Cite This Article

APA
Hopster K, Driessen B. (2021). Pharmacology of the Equine Foot: Medical Pain Management for Laminitis. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract, 37(3), 549-561. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cveq.2021.08.004

Publication

ISSN: 1558-4224
NlmUniqueID: 8511904
Country: United States
Language: English
Volume: 37
Issue: 3
Pages: 549-561
PII: S0749-0739(21)00056-0

Researcher Affiliations

Hopster, Klaus
  • Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA. Electronic address: khopster@upenn.edu.
Driessen, Bernd
  • Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.

MeSH Terms

  • Analgesics / therapeutic use
  • Animals
  • Horse Diseases / drug therapy
  • Horses
  • Lidocaine / therapeutic use
  • Pain / drug therapy
  • Pain / veterinary
  • Pain Management / veterinary

Conflict of Interest Statement

Disclosure The authors have nothing to disclose.

Citations

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