Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association2004; 224(4); 562-564; doi: 10.2460/javma.2004.224.562

Association between cribbing and entrapment of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen in horses: 68 cases (1991-2002).

Abstract: To determine whether there was an association between a history of cribbing and epiploic foramen entrapment (EFE) of the small intestine in horses. Methods: Retrospective study. Methods: 68 horses examined at the University of Illinois or the University of Liverpool veterinary teaching hospitals. Methods: For horses examined at the University of Illinois that underwent surgery because of strangulating small intestine lesions, information about cribbing was obtained through telephone calls with owners. For horses examined at the University of Liverpool that underwent surgery for colic for any reason, information about cribbing was obtained through a preoperative questionnaire. Results: 13 of 19 (68%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Illinois had a history of cribbing, compared with only 2 of 34 (6%) horses with other strangulating small intestine lesions (odds ratio, 34.7; 95% confidence interval, 6.2 to 194.6). Similarly, 24 of 49 (49%) horses with EFE examined at the University of Liverpool had a history of cribbing, compared with 72 of 687 (10.5%) horses with colic caused by other lesions (odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval, 4.5 to 15.1). Conclusions: Results suggest that there may be an association between cribbing and EFE in horses, with horses with a history of cribbing more likely to have EFE than horses without such a history.
Publication Date: 2004-03-03 PubMed ID: 14989551DOI: 10.2460/javma.2004.224.562Google Scholar: Lookup
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  • Journal Article
  • Research Support
  • Non-U.S. Gov't

Summary

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The research is about the potential connection between the behavioral issue of cribbing in horses and a specific type of intestinal entrapment, specifically epiploic foramen entrapment (EFE). The findings suggest that horses with a history of cribbing are significantly more likely to experience EFE than those without such a history.

Research Methodology and Sample

  • The research used a retrospective study design and was based on examining 68 horses at two veterinary teaching hospitals – University of Illinois and University of Liverpool.
  • Information about the horses and their history of cribbing was collected in two different ways. For the University of Illinois sample, researchers reached out to the owners via telephone calls. They specifically inquired about the horses that underwent surgery for strangulating small intestine lesions. At the University of Liverpool, the data was collected using preoperative questionnaires provided to the owners of horses that had surgery for colic for any reason.

Research Findings

  • The study found that 13 out of 19 horses (approximately 68%) with EFE at the University of Illinois had a history of cribbing. This was in contrast to only 2 of 34 horses (roughly 6%) with other types of strangulating small intestine lesions.
  • Analogous results were observed at the University of Liverpool. There, 49% of horses with EFE were found to have a history of cribbing, compared to a much lower rate of 10.5% for horses with other types of colic lesions.
  • The odds ratio calculated offers a quantitative measure of the association between cribbing and EFE in horses. At the University of Illinois, the odds ratio was extremely high (34.7), while at the University of Liverpool it was 8.2.

Conclusions

  • The research concludes with the suggestion that there is a significant correlation between cribbing behavior in horses and EFE – a type of small intestine entrapment. Horses with a history of cribbing were found to be substantially more likely to have EFE compared to those with no such behavior history.

Relevance of this research lies in its potential to assist in the diagnosis and treatment approach for horses exhibiting cribbing behavior, especially in managing the risk of EFE in such cases.

Cite This Article

APA
Archer DC, Freeman DE, Doyle AJ, Proudman CJ, Edwards GB. (2004). Association between cribbing and entrapment of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen in horses: 68 cases (1991-2002). J Am Vet Med Assoc, 224(4), 562-564. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.2004.224.562

Publication

ISSN: 0003-1488
NlmUniqueID: 7503067
Country: United States
Language: English
Volume: 224
Issue: 4
Pages: 562-564

Researcher Affiliations

Archer, Debra C
  • Philip Leverhulme Large Animal Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool, Leahurst, Neston, Wirral CH64 7TE, UK.
Freeman, David E
    Doyle, Aimie J
      Proudman, Christopher J
        Edwards, G Barrie

          MeSH Terms

          • Animals
          • Behavior, Animal
          • Colic / etiology
          • Colic / surgery
          • Colic / veterinary
          • Confidence Intervals
          • Horse Diseases / epidemiology
          • Horse Diseases / etiology
          • Horse Diseases / surgery
          • Horses
          • Intestinal Obstruction / epidemiology
          • Intestinal Obstruction / etiology
          • Intestinal Obstruction / surgery
          • Intestinal Obstruction / veterinary
          • Intestine, Small / pathology
          • Odds Ratio
          • Retrospective Studies
          • Stereotyped Behavior

          Citations

          This article has been cited 4 times.
          1. Asin J, Nyaoke AC, Samol MA, Arthur RM, Uzal FA. Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile-associated disease, epiploic foramen entrapment, and gastric rupture in a Thoroughbred racehorse: case report and literature review.. J Vet Diagn Invest 2022 Sep;34(5):913-917.
            doi: 10.1177/10406387221118039pubmed: 35949155google scholar: lookup
          2. Curtis L, Burford JH, England GCW, Freeman SL. Risk factors for acute abdominal pain (colic) in the adult horse: A scoping review of risk factors, and a systematic review of the effect of management-related changes.. PLoS One 2019;14(7):e0219307.
            doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0219307pubmed: 31295284google scholar: lookup
          3. Grzeskowiak RM, Barrett EJ, Rodgerson DH. Cecal entrapment within the epiploic foramen in a mare.. Can Vet J 2017 Aug;58(8):842-844.
            pubmed: 28761191
          4. Escalona EE, Okell CN, Archer DC. Prevalence of and risk factors for colic in horses that display crib-biting behaviour.. BMC Vet Res 2014;10 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):S3.
            doi: 10.1186/1746-6148-10-S1-S3pubmed: 25238292google scholar: lookup