Journal of equine veterinary science2022; 110; 103863; doi: 10.1016/j.jevs.2022.103863

Dietary Supplements of Vitamins E, C, and β-Carotene to Reduce Oxidative Stress in Horses: An Overview.

Abstract: Oxidative stress is the excess generation of free radicals and/or a decrease in the response of the antioxidant system. It is known to cause damage to the equine health by unbalancing the stable molecules. The dietary supplementation of vitamins E, C, and β-carotene cause beneficial effect on horses' health. These supplements could transform free radicals into the stable radicals, thereby showing importance in the prevention of diseases associated with oxidative stress. Adding vitamins E, C, and β-carotene to the horses' diets in stressful conditions could decrease the production of free radicals that cause inflammation and tissue damage, the typical characteristics that have been associated with oxidative stress. This review spotlights the available evidence of the benefits of dietary supplements of vitamins E, C, and β-carotene towards the reduction of oxidative stress in horses.
Publication Date: 2022-01-10 PubMed ID: 35017039DOI: 10.1016/j.jevs.2022.103863Google Scholar: Lookup
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Summary

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This research article discusses the positive effects of supplementing horses’ diets with vitamins E, C, and β-carotene in order to combat oxidative stress, which can lead to inflammation and tissue damage.

Underlying Concepts

  • The study is focused on oxidative stress in horses, a condition that is characterized by an overproduction of harmful free radicals or a weakening of the antioxidant system. This imbalance can adversely impact the health of horses by destabilizing their molecular structures.
  • Elements known as free radicals are potentially damaging as they contain unpaired electrons, making them highly reactive and capable of causing harm to cells and tissues.
  • Role of Vitamins E, C, and β-carotene

    • The research emphasizes the importance of vitamins E, C, and β-carotene as dietary supplements for horses. These vitamins function as powerful antioxidants, which are substances that can neutralize harmful free radicals by transforming them into stable molecules.
    • The use of these supplements is crucial in preventing diseases linked to oxidative stress.
    • Dietary Management of Oxidative Stress

      • The paper suggests that in conditions of stress, supplementing a horse’s diet with vitamins E, C, and β-carotene can potentially lower the production of free radicals. This, in turn, reduces inflammation and tissue damage, which are the typical outcomes of oxidative stress.

      Review of Available Evidence

      • The article reviews a variety of existing studies and evidence demonstrating the benefits of using supplements of vitamins E, C, and β-carotene in reducing oxidative stress in horses.
      • By reviewing and synthesizing this evidence, the authors create a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the role of these vitamins in the management of oxidative stress in horses.

Cite This Article

APA
Garcia EIC, Elghandour MMMY, Khusro A, Alcala-Canto Y, Tirado-Gonzu00e1lez DN, Barbabosa-Pliego A, Salem AZM. (2022). Dietary Supplements of Vitamins E, C, and β-Carotene to Reduce Oxidative Stress in Horses: An Overview. J Equine Vet Sci, 110, 103863. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2022.103863

Publication

ISSN: 0737-0806
NlmUniqueID: 8216840
Country: United States
Language: English
Volume: 110
Pages: 103863
PII: S0737-0806(22)00001-6

Researcher Affiliations

Garcia, Erendira Itzel Ceja
  • Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autu00f3noma del Estado de Mu00e9xico, Estado de Mu00e9xico, Mu00e9xico.
Elghandour, Mona M M Y
  • Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autu00f3noma del Estado de Mu00e9xico, Estado de Mu00e9xico, Mu00e9xico.
Khusro, Ameer
  • Research Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Loyola College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
Alcala-Canto, Yazmin
  • Departamento de Parasitologia, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico.
Tirado-Gonzu00e1lez, Deli Nazmu00edn
  • CENID Agricultura Familiar/INIFAP, Jalisco, Mu00e9xico.
Barbabosa-Pliego, Alberto
  • Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autu00f3noma del Estado de Mu00e9xico, Estado de Mu00e9xico, Mu00e9xico.
Salem, Abdelfattah Z M
  • Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Autu00f3noma del Estado de Mu00e9xico, Estado de Mu00e9xico, Mu00e9xico. Electronic address: asalem70@yahoo.com.

MeSH Terms

  • Animals
  • Ascorbic Acid
  • Dietary Supplements
  • Horses
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Vitamin E / pharmacology
  • Vitamins / pharmacology
  • beta Carotene / pharmacology

Citations

This article has been cited 1 times.
  1. Culhuac EB, Maggiolino A, Elghandour MMMY, De Palo P, Salem AZM. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Phytochemicals Found in the Yucca Genus.. Antioxidants (Basel) 2023 Feb 24;12(3).
    doi: 10.3390/antiox12030574pubmed: 36978823google scholar: lookup