Animals : an open access journal from MDPI2022; 12(14); 1774; doi: 10.3390/ani12141774

The Differences in Histoarchitecture of Hoof Lamellae between Obese and Lean Draft Horses.

Abstract: Obesity is a common problem in horses. The associations between obesity and equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) and between EMS and laminitis are known. However, there is a lack of data on whether obesity itself can affect hoof lamellae. Forelimbs and blood from 12 draft horses (six obese and six lean) from a slaughterhouse were acquired. To exclude laminitis and EMS horses, insulin concentration was measured, and hooves were radiographed. Histological evaluation was performed. The shape of the primary and secondary epidermal lamellae (PEL and SEL) was evaluated, and the length of the keratinized and total primary epidermal lamellae was measured (KPEL and TEL). All horses showed pathological changes in lamellae. In the lean group, the changes were longer SELs, more proliferated and separated PDLs, and less standard PDLs. In the obese group, the changes were a lower number of club-shaped and standard SELs and significantly more tapered SELs. No difference in the shape of PELs and the length of KPELs was noticed. The research did not confirm the effects of obesity on lamellar failure. The measurements taken indicate that the lamellae are much longer compared to other research studies; this could indicate that the length of the PEL depends on the hoof size.
Publication Date: 2022-07-11 PubMed ID: 35883323PubMed Central: PMC9311632DOI: 10.3390/ani12141774Google Scholar: Lookup
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Summary

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The research article investigates the potential connection between obesity in horses and changes in the structure of their hoof lamellae. Despite significant changes being observed in the hooves of all horses, the study concluded that obesity does not directly cause lamellar failure.

Introduction to the Research

  • The research focused on uncovering a potential link between obesity in horses and changes in hoof lamellae, which represents the tissue layers within the hooves. It is crucial as pathological changes in lamellae have been linked to laminitis, a painful and potentially debilitating foot disease.
  • Although obesity is known to be connected with Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) and EMS with laminitis, researchers sought to uncover whether obesity itself can impact the structure of the hoof lamellae.

Methodology

  • Samples and data were collected from 12 draft horses from a slaughterhouse, six of which were classified as obese and six as lean.
  • To ensure only non-EMS and non-laminitic horses were studied, insulin concentration was measured, and hoof radiography was performed.
  • Pathological examination of the hooves was carried out, with the shape of primary and secondary epidermal lamellae (PEL and SEL) being evaluated and measured.

Findings

  • All horses exhibited alterations in lamellae, though the specific changes differed based on the obesity status of the horse.
  • In lean horses, the changes included longer secondary epidermal lamellae (SEL)s, more proliferated and separated primary dermal lamellae (PDL)s, and less standard PDLs.
  • In obese horses, researchers found fewer club-shaped and standard SELs, and significantly more tapered SELs, displaying a different pattern of pathological changes.

Conclusions and Implications

  • The study concluded that obesity itself did not directly cause failure in hoof lamellae based on the measurements and evaluations performed.
  • The report also made a specific observation related to the length of primary epidermal lamellae (PEL), it was found to be substantial as compared to previous studies, indicating that PEL length may be connected to hoof size.
  • This study provides valuable details about the differences in hoof lamillae in lean and obese horses, leading to a better understanding of their hoof health and related diseases.

Cite This Article

APA
Senderska-Pu0142onowska M, Siwiu0144ska N, Zak-Bochenek A, Rykau0142a M, Su0142owikowska M, Madej JP, Kaleta-Kuratewicz K, Niedu017awiedu017a A. (2022). The Differences in Histoarchitecture of Hoof Lamellae between Obese and Lean Draft Horses. Animals (Basel), 12(14), 1774. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani12141774

Publication

ISSN: 2076-2615
NlmUniqueID: 101635614
Country: Switzerland
Language: English
Volume: 12
Issue: 14
PII: 1774

Researcher Affiliations

Senderska-Pu0142onowska, Magdalena
  • Department of Immunology, Pathophysiology and Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-137 Wroclaw, Poland.
Siwiu0144ska, Natalia
  • Department of Internal Medicine and Clinic of Diseases of Horses, Dogs and Cats, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland.
Zak-Bochenek, Agnieszka
  • Department of Immunology, Pathophysiology and Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-137 Wroclaw, Poland.
Rykau0142a, Marta
  • Department of Internal Medicine and Clinic of Diseases of Horses, Dogs and Cats, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland.
Su0142owikowska, Malwina
  • Department of Internal Medicine and Clinic of Diseases of Horses, Dogs and Cats, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland.
Madej, Jan P
  • Department of Immunology, Pathophysiology and Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-137 Wroclaw, Poland.
Kaleta-Kuratewicz, Katarzyna
  • Department of Biostructure and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-375 Wroclaw, Poland.
Niedu017awiedu017a, Artur
  • Department of Internal Medicine and Clinic of Diseases of Horses, Dogs and Cats, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland.

Conflict of Interest Statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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